Thank you, Yolmer Sánchez!

A decade of fun and laughter: The White Sox gave him a chance, and Yolmer Sánchez has capitalized on it for the past 10 years. (Ashley Sanders)


As my favorite Chicago White Sox player, the recent moves surrounding Yolmer Sánchez have been difficult to comprehend. Instead of dwelling on something that I cannot control, I decided to go back and research (with the tremendous help from Baseball-Reference) Sánchez’s progress throughout the Sox organization and celebrate the life that he has given to his team and fans.

Sánchez became a member of the Chicago White Sox organization on May 6, 2009. At the time, Sánchez was known as “Carlos”: A 16-year-old, switch-hitting infielder looking for a chance to make it to The Show. (For respect toward his name, Sánchez will be referred to as “Yolmer” throughout the article.)

The timeline of Sánchez’s impact as a member of the White Sox:

2009-11

For his first two years in the organization, Yolmer played for the Dominican Summer League and the Appalachian League. By 2011, Sánchez made his way out of rookie ball, playing second base and shortstop for the Low-A Kannapolis Intimidators.

For the four months (June-September) that Sánchez was in Kannapolis, he batted .288/.341/.345. He accumulated 76 hits in 63 games, snagged seven bags, and even shot a long ball into the stands! As for his defense, Sánchez had a .980 fielding percentage at second base (53 games) and a .949 fielding percentage at shortstop (10 games).

2012

Sánchez’s early success propelled him to start with the High-A Winston-Salem Dash for the beginning of the 2012 season. From April to July, Yolmer slashed .315/.374/.395 in 92 games. With 19 stolen bases, six triples, and another home run, Sánchez was promoted to the Birmingham Barons (Double-A). In 30 games, Sánchez’s batting line looked like this: .370/.424/.462. On the up-and-up again, Yolmer traveled to his third minor league team in just one baseball year, the Triple-A Charlotte Knights.

At 20, Sánchez was one of the youngest players in Triple-A. The actual youngest at the time? Mike Trout, 19.

In a limited, 11-game window, Sánchez batted .256/.256/.308. Collectively, Sánchez was positioned at shortstop for 68 games and second base for 60, where he was credited with .967 and .982 fielding percentages, respectively. He aided 46 double plays at short and 39 at second. Overall, 2012 saw Yolmer surging through the ranks, as he was firing on all cylinders.

Sánchez did participate in the Sox’s Arizona Fall League, and played winter Venezuelan baseball to cap off his successful 2012 campaign.

2013

Yolmer started and ended his 2013 season with the Charlotte Knights, continuing where he left off the year prior. In 112 games, Yolmer slashed .241/.293/.296. He still saw roughly even playing time at short and second. Playing 52 games at shortstop, Sánchez had a .943 fielding percentage; for the 61 games at second base, Sánchez fielded .983. He was a part of 67 total double plays, and he only committed four errors while playing second.

For the third straight year, Sánchez went on to play winter ball in Venezuela.

2014

For the second straight year, Sánchez started the season with Charlotte. He played 110 games, all the while fighting to not fall back into organizational filler status. After a disappointing offensive 2013, Sánchez performed to the high standards of a .293/.349/.412 batting line. Yolmer played twice at third, 44 games at short and 64 games at second with outstanding fielding percentages across the board.

Establishing himself as a reliable defender and an uprising hitter, Sánchez received the call in July and made his way to The Show!

On July 13, 2014, Sánchez donned No. 77 in his major league debut for the Chicago White Sox, a team who had all the faith in a Venezuelan teenager. Batting second and playing shortstop, Sánchez began a five-year stint in the majors. Unfortunately, he went went 0-for-5, popping out to second base in his first plate appearances and striking out twice. However, Yolmer was perfect in the field, foreshadowing his incredible skill that would eventually earn him a Gold Glove in 2019.

In his second major league baseball game on August 2, Sánchez secured his first major league hit, a single to right field off of Detroit’s Shane Greene, in a 3-for-4 performance!

Sanchez Rookie Season.JPG

On September 27, 2014, I snapped a shot of my favorite player for years to come. Note the lack of accent mark on the jersey in those less-enlightened days. (Ashley Sanders)

Sánchez finished the rest of the 2014 season with the White Sox. He played 28 games: one at short and 27 at second base. He recorded an almost-perfect fielding percentage of .992 at second. Offensively, Yolmer batted .250/.269/.300.

Once again, Sánchez went to Venezuela to play winter ball for the Tiburones de La Guaira to finish his 2014 baseball campaign.

2015

When the 2015 season came rolling into view, Sánchez started his year with the Sox (debuting his new No. 5 jersey). However, it was a short-lived stint from April 8 to April 10, heading back to Charlotte from April 12 to May 13. Not losing any hope for a long-term major-league stay, Sánchez put together a .344/.368/.466 batting line back on the farm. With 26 games at second base, Sánchez put together a .980 fielding percentage, and he played perfect defense at third base for three games.

Tearing up the minors as he did, the White Sox brought Sánchez back up to the big leagues. And shortly into his second stint of the season with the Sox, Sánchez made a major impact.

Sanchez 2015.JPG

On July 11, 2015, Yolmer Sánchez signed a baseball for me down in St. Pete, my very first player autograph. (Ashley Sanders) 

Later that month, my man, Yolmer Homer, ripped a long ball to the stands!

The following day, this happened:

Hyping my No. 1:

Selfie Sunday Sanchez

Arguably the best-ever promotion by the White Sox (#SelfieSunday) gave me another chance to meet Sánchez, on Aug. 30, 2015. (Ashley Sanders)

Sanchez Photo Bomb

Sánchez photobombed a picture featuring my Mom, Avisaíl García, and me. (Ashley Sanders)

First Selfie with Sanchez

Sánchez and I snapped a selfie, a tradition for many years to come. (Ashley Sanders)

Sánchez finished the 2015 season playing 120 games with the South Siders. He batted .224/.268/.326, crushing five home runs, notching a triple, and going 2-for-2 in steals. Defensively, Sánchez played all his games at second base, securing a .990 fielding percentage. Overall, he made a lifelong fan.

Winter 2015 was the last time Sánchez ventured back to his home country to play winter ball.

2016

In order to improve his bat, Sánchez started his 2016 campaign with the Knights. He played 61 games, racking up a .255/.309/.421 batting line, with a .984 fielding percentage between short and second base. Staying true to pattern, Sánchez found his way back to the majors … twice!

And after the July 27 call-up, Sánchez was up with Chicago to stay.

He played 53 games with the Sox that season. He put up a disappointing slash line of .208/.236/.357 with four home runs, but Sánchez did not lose hope.

2017

Before the 2017 season, Sánchez was asked, for the first time in his professional career, how he would like to be addressed. He responded with, “Yolmer,” and a resurgence of Sánchez occurred!

#LeadoffYolmerHomer

Sánchez played 141 games in 2017 with a much-improved batting line: .267/.319/.413. He hit a career-high 12 homers on the season (#YolmerHomer) and had a career-high 59 RBIs. Splitting time between second base (78 games) and third base (52 games) (with two outfield appearances and one at shortstop), Yolmer had .981 and .977 fielding percentages, respectively. This was his best season as a South Sider. Overall he established himself as a reliable, dependable player in his first full season with the White Sox.

2018

This influence carried over into the 2018 season where Sánchez earned his first ever spot in the Opening Day lineup! He started at third base, his primary position of the season. Having a solidified spot in the lineup, Yolmer went on to have another impactful year.

Yolmer April 2018

The first Yolmer selfie of the 2018 season (April 23)! (Ashley Sanders)

And Yolmer kicked off the season with the most iconic Gatorade celebration of the century:

Yolmer Father's Day 2018.JPG

Father’s Day selfie. (Ashley Sanders)

Back at St. Pete where it all began:

The goofy shenanigans strike again:

When I thought that I couldn’t love Yolmer any more than I already do:

Silly Yolmer

Sept. 1, 2018 was one of the best days of my life. (Ashley Sanders)

When 2018 came to a close, Sánchez put up a .242/.306/.372 batting line with eight long balls and 55 RBIs. He recorded a hat trick for career-highs in games played, plate appearances, and triples: 155, 662, and 10, respectively. In fact, Sánchez and Mallex Smith led the American League with 10 triples apiece.

Christmas Sanchez

Best Christmas present ever. (Ashley Sanders)

2019

For a second straight season, Yolmer Sánchez earned a spot in the Opening Day lineup. Uncharacteristically, Sánchez made four errors within the first 10 games, but had only five the rest of the season.

Sanchez Selfie 2019

Another season, another Sánchez selfie (June 15, 2019)! (Ashley Sanders)

Another year, another trip to St. Pete:

Game recognizing game:

Game Recognizes Game

Icons

Sanchez Autograph

Sánchez wrapped up the 2019 season hitting .252/.318/.321 and came in clutch a few times this season:

His fielding percentage was .987, and he aided in a career-high 108 double plays, and he made many beautiful plays like this:

With his tremendous showing as a second baseman, Sánchez earned the Rawlings Gold Glove Award for 2019, beating out finalists DJ LeMahieu and José Altuve.

From his 10 years playing baseball as a member of the White Sox organization, Yolmer Sánchez brought an infectious personality, a reliable glove, and a guy who meets with the fans before every single baseball game. He has accumulated a 8.6 WAR in his major league career. He’s batting .244/.299/.357, and he has hit 31 #YolmerHomers. His career fielding percentage sits at .986 for second base, and he helped turn 330 double plays. At 27 years old, there is still room for growth. His personality and glove-dependability almost ensured himself as a piece to this team’s future … until the bad news dropped:

It’s a bitter business, and it’s a shame that Sánchez has become a free agent. Forever the optimist, I hope by some miracle that Yolmer is signed back into the South Side. Regardless, he is a player who deserves to be on a team by the time spring training rolls around. I’ll be rooting for him no matter where he goes.

I would like to thank Yolmer for bringing life to the organization, hustling during every play, and for being a fan’s favorite player. He gave me someone to root for, and for all his kind acts, this is the least I can do to illustrate my gratitude.

Here’s to Yolmer Sánchez!

 

Early moves close the book on the rebuild — it’s time to start winning!

It’s a Yaz! So far, White Sox fans are seeing less of the labor and more of the baby this offseason. (YouTube)


At this time last year, the White Sox were embarking on a seemingly endless journey in pursuit of Bryce Harper and Manny Machado. The club had a minimal payroll heading into the 2018 offseason, and seemed like they were in a good position to land one of the big fish. Even though the team wasn’t completely ready to start winning and they still had to work on the development of some of their own key players, Rick Hahn and Co. knew this was an opportunity that they couldn’t pass up.

With Harper and Machado having a smaller market due to their steep price tag, the White Sox were aggressive in their pursuits early as they tried to sell both players on the future of the ballclub, and how they would have a great opportunity to win consistently on the South Side. Unfortunately, we all know how this story ends, as the White Sox came up completely empty. It was yet another offseason where the White Sox were actively engaging with the big free agents, but swung and missed, leaving a lot of fans in doubt about the team’s future.

Sure, the White Sox do have talent in the farm system. However, it’s almost impossible to win on homegrown talent alone. Teams need to be able to supplement what they already have with players from outside of the organization, whether to fill holes, bring over veterans to guide younger players, or make the most of an opportunity to sign/trade for a player who once might’ve looked like a longshot. There are many reasons why free agency and trades are important, and after last offseason’s shutout it started to feel like the White Sox were running out of time to strike and make an impact move.

Fast forward to this offseason, where the White Sox once again found their name in the rumors surrounding almost all of the top free agents available. There was a little more skepticism from fans this time around, and rightfully so, as they didn’t want to get their hopes up again in what could be another failure of an offseason. Hahn acknowledged the frustration, and knew this offseason was important when he addressed the media at the GM Meetings earlier this month:

And he was right. White Sox fans are tired of “having a seat at the table” as Hahn likes to say, and want the front office to start making things happen. Being in the mix for top tier free agents and coming up empty is an exhausting practice, especially for a fan base that is starving for a winning team. At the conclusion of the 2019 season, the team was trending upwards, in large part due to the developments of core players, the arrival of Eloy Jimenez and Dylan Cease, and with Luis Robert and Nick Madrigal on the way shortly. In addition to that, the team would be getting Michael Kopech and Carlos Rodón back for the upcoming season as well.

With all the positive developments that came from last season, the White Sox still needed a few dominoes to fall, and had to make something happen this winter in order to start putting out a product that could win consistently. The team still has quite a few holes to fill with starting pitching, left-handed hitting, and right field being the most notable. This free agent class was littered with plenty of names that could fill those gaps and instantly be an upgrade, and it was time for the White Sox to, in Hahn’s parlance, show us the baby.

It didn’t take long for the organization to show they were serious about winning this offseason, as they came out of the gates quickly and inked Yasmani Grandal to a four-year, $73 million deal that gave the catcher the largest contract in the history of the franchise.

Grandal checks off a lot of boxes for the White Sox. He’s a switch-hitter with power from both sides of the plate, gets on base frequently, and is one of the best defensive backstops in the game. This is that type of immediate-impact signing that will benefit the club and pitching staff in many ways. Everything Grandal brings to the table makes him the complete package, and his name was up there as one of the best available free agents. The White Sox were able to get the deal done and outbid the rest of his suitors, which is a result that isn’t common on the South Side.

After a painfully long 2018 offseason, it was beyond refreshing to see the White Sox get a deal of that significance done early in the process. It also goes to show that Hahn and Co. are ready to get down to business this year. Not to mention, having Grandal as a member of the team now makes the White Sox a more attractive destination for other free agents, especially pitchers. He’s a highly-respected catcher throughout baseball, and just about anyone would benefit from working with him full-time. His elite framing ability is going to get the most out of the pitchers he works with, as he’s sure to get them a ton of extra strikes during his time in Chicago.

One free agent pitcher that the White Sox have been linked to this offseason is Zack Wheeler, one of the most prized pitching targets this winter. Members from the Mets media and other Mets outlets started mentioning the White Sox as serious suitors for Wheeler. Danny Abriano of SNY even went as far to say that the White Sox were among the “leading group” of teams bidding for Wheeler’s services. This news dropped just days before the Grandal signing became official, so Hahn was working on signing not just one significant free agent right away, but two.

Hahn could’ve sat around and celebrated the first big signing, but instead immediately went right back to work, focused on making the White Sox a winning team, and making them a winning team now. There hasn’t been much movement on the Wheeler front since those initial tidbits of information dropped, but at least the club has identified what would be another major upgrade — and they wouldn’t have to spend $200 million or more for that upgrade, as they would have last year. Sure, Gerrit Cole or Stephen Strasburg would both be incredible additions, but those two are likely going to be out of price range. It would be wise to allocate the money among multiple players, as opposed to sinking most of it into one arm. Wheeler is in a tier slightly below Cole and Strasburg, but he has the potential to be a very good pitcher for a long time — and at half the price.

In addition to that, the White Sox outrighted Yolmer Sánchez and signed José Abreu to a three-year, $50 million dollar contract. The Abreu deal didn’t make much sense at the time, especially considering the fact that he recently accepted the qualifying offer. However, with the extension, the White Sox will save money this year and it won’t hamper their ability to continue to sign free agents. Not to mention, Abreu has been around some rough teams during his White Sox career and he deserves some security for the next few years. As far as Yolmer goes, that decision was made primarily because he was due to make $6.2 million in arbitration. Even though he’s fresh off of winning a Gold Glove, defense is about the only value he provides to the team, unless you count being a clubhouse guy/Gatorade showers.

The White Sox could’ve easily been OK with paying Yolmer the $6.2 million, because they still aren’t committed to a high payroll as of now, and to be honest, I wouldn’t have been surprised if they did that. However, with Madrigal being ready to take over second base in the not-so-distant future, it didn’t make sense to pay Yolmer to ride the bench. The team also has Danny Mendick, who can contribute much more offensively than Sánchez, and while he’s not a Gold Glove-caliber defender, he is solid defensively and can play multiple positions. Mendick is a perfect fit to hold it down at second base while Madrigal finishes up his development in Triple-A. Barring any surprise trades or signings, I would expect Mendick to take that job for now.

So what happens next? Well, the White Sox are off to a good start this winter, but their work isn’t even close to being done. Grandal was a great signing, but they still need to add more. We know the White Sox are once again in the mix with a lot of free agents, but this time around it feels a little different. They’ve made some noise early, and it finally seems like the front office is ready to shift their focus towards winning and being more competitive. They’ve already shown the willingness to outbid other teams and set the market for certain players, and hopefully they will continue to do that with their other targets.

The AL Central is the worst division in baseball right now. With a few more moves and the arrival of some of the highly-touted prospects, the White Sox could potentially be in the heat of a divisional race for most of next year. At the very least, there should be significant improvement, and the team might be able to squeeze their way into a wild card spot. A lot would have to go right for the White Sox to be fighting for the playoffs in 2020, but for now, at least the team is closing the book on the rebuild and is ready to start winning.

Deep Dive: Yolmer Sánchez’s past, present and future with the White Sox

Precious metal: Sánchez, who’s been with the White Sox organization since 2009, just won his first Gold Glove Award. What will his role be, if any, in the White Sox organization for 2020? (@CarlosSan29)


“Deep Dive” focuses on the depth of each position in the Chicago White Sox organization. Each position is broken into a five-part series:

  1. Depth in the rookie levels (Dominican through Great Falls)
  2. Depth in A-ball (Kannapolis and Winston-Salem)
  3. Depth in the higher levels (Birmingham and Charlotte)
  4. Under the Radar-type detail on one of the White Sox players at that position
  5. Free agent options at that position

How did he get here?

It’s hard to believe, but Sánchez has been in the White Sox organization since 2009, the year the Venezuela native received an international signing bonus from the team as a 17-year-old (of course, back then, he was known as “Carlos”). Sánchez received his first taste of professional ball in 2010 with the DSL White Sox, and showed off his potential by walking 41 times (as opposed to 26 strikeouts) in 52 games. The 2011 campaign saw Sanchez begin with Bristol, although he played the vast majority of the season with Kannapolis and fared well by slashing .288/.341/.345 in 63 games.

The 2012 season was pivotal for season, as he slashed an impressive .323/.378/.403 for the organization’s top three affiliates while playing his usually high standard of defense. He struggled with the bat in his first full season with Charlotte the following year, as he slashed just .241/.293/.296 in 112 games. Sánchez bounced back nicely in 2014, however, as he slashed .293/.349/.412 in 110 games with Charlotte, which earned him his first trip to the majors, where he struggled in 100 at-bats.

Sánchez began the 2015 season again with Charlotte, but after beginning the year with a .344/.368/.466 line in 29 games, earned a longer trip to the majors, where he again struggled — this time slashing just .224/.268/.326 in 120 games. The Charlotte-to-Chicago train kept running for Sánchez in 2016, as he split the season nearly equally with both teams with decent but uninspiring results.

The 2017 season was Sánchez’s best to date, as he slashed .267/.319/.413 in 141 games as a third baseman with 19 doubles, eight triples, 12 homers, 59 RBIs, eight stolen bases, 35 walks (6.6%) and 111 strikeouts (20.8%). His production slipped a bit in 2018, however, as he slashed .242/.306/.372 in 155 games with 34 doubles, a league-leading 10 triples, eight homers, 55 RBIs, 14 stolen bases, 49 walks (7.4%) and 138 strikeouts (20.8%).

With the White Sox in 2019

With budding superstar Yoán Moncada switching to third base, Sánchez moved to his more natural position at second. After struggling defensively at the season’s outset, Sánchez improved his glovework enough to win a Gold Glove, which he richly deserved. After a terrible start offensively to begin the season, Sánchez finished the year by slashing .252/.318/.321 in 149 games with 20 doubles, four triples, two homers, 43 RBIs, five stolen bases, 44 walks (7.9%) and 117 strikeouts (21.1%). Sánchez fared far better as a right-handed hitter (.292/.348/.392) than a lefty (.239/.309/.298). Weirdly enough, Sánchez did much better in night games (.282/.342/.347) than during the day (.208/.283/.282). He also posted respectable numbers with RISP, as he hit .282 in those situations. What’s not mentioned in Sánchez’s stats are his charisma and childlike enthusiasm, which are both infectious — especially for a younger club.

Unfortunately, his modest numbers on offense somewhat negated Sánchez’s defense. Even with the lack of significant offensive production, however, Sánchez still supplied the team with a 2.1 bWAR. Considering that each WAR point is worth approximately $7.7 million on the free agent market per FanGraphs, Sánchez still proved an impressive $11.545 million value when considering his 2019 salary was $4.625 million. Of course, this doesn’t even include his off-the-field value to the team.

What does the future have in store?

This is where things get tricky. First-rounder Nick Madrigal seems slated to play significant time at second base this year, which would essentially relegate Sánchez to reserve status. MLB Trade Rumors estimated Sanchez’s 2020 post-arbitration salary at $6.5 million, which would make him a great bargain if he were a starter; as a reserve, there’s no way to expect that Sánchez would finish next year anywhere close to a 2.0 WAR. When you add in the fact that Danny Mendick (not to mention Leury García) could fill that infield utility role at significantly less cost, Sánchez could be looking for a new home in 2020.

Even if the White Sox non-tender Sánchez, it’s possible that both parties could negotiate a smaller deal — especially if the team believes that Mendick wouldn’t quite be ready for full-season major league duties. As a player who’s actually been in the White Sox organization longer than anyone else, it would be nice to see Sánchez contribute —even if it’s just as a reserve infielder — to a winning team for a change.


Gamethread: Tigers at White Sox

Bittersweet: The end of a season is never easy, but time to recharge, revise, and regroup is a necessity. (@WhiteSox)

Game No. 161

The Chicago White Sox are 71-89 and will be desperately trying to earn their 72nd win over their 90th loss. It’s Game 161 of the season, and José Abreu leads the American League in RBIs. Tim Anderson is about to clinch the AL and MLB batting title, and Yoán Moncada will try to hold his place in the top-three of the leading AL batting averages.

Let’s not forget my guy, Yolmer Sánchez, who is in the running for a Gold Glove award!

Although the season was disappointing in more ways than not, there was a lot of sunshine to be cherished during the past seven months. Lucas Giolito had a complete turnaround, Aaron Bummer was a star reliever, James McCann was a revelation, and the emergence of Eloy Jiménez. The list can go on. I know there is a lot of work to be done in the offseason, but I’m going to enjoy these accomplishments as the final out of today’s ballgame is made.

Before the final out will be made, Ross Detwiler is the man in charge of securing the 72nd win of a one-game shortened season. The Southpaw owns a 3-5 record and a 6.85 ERA in 17 games this season. It has been a rollercoaster for the veteran reliever, so let’s hope this ride ends with a win in the bag.

Spencer Turnbull will take the mound on the behalf of the Detroit Tigers. The righty is 3-16 with a 4.59 ERA in 29 games played this season. The Good Guys saw Turnbull for the first and only time on August 5. The South Siders snagged two runs off of two hits and three walks in a three-inning outing by Turnbull. I anticpate more of the same this afternoon.

The end-of-the-season lineups:

Yolmer “Carlos” “Homer” “Ashley’s Favorite Player” Sánchez bats leadoff, and the MLB batting title leader and AL RBI leader follow.

Last night’s hero, Victor Reyes, bats leadoff for the Tigers; the future Hall of Famer Miguel Cabrera bats third.

It’s a 2:10 CT start; NBC Sports Chicago has the broadcast, and WGN-AM has the radio. @jresis, @lwilz17, and I will be battling it out for the #SoxMath semifinals!

Good luck to the competitors; a stacked SSHP final would definitely be awesome!

Ultimately, I would love nothing more than to debut the sunglasses emoji for an exciting 2019 finish and to foreshadow a hopeful 2020 playoff team. Let’s go and get it, White Sox!

Six Pack of Stats: White Sox 7, Cleveland 1

Pitching and Offense: It all came together in a terrific afternoon ballgame that resulted in a series split with Cleveland. (FanGraphs)

Masterful pitching and flaming bats spark a series-split afternoon victory

Last night’s late-innings offense, which was beautifully complemented by an outstanding pitching performance by Reynaldo López, carried over into this early afternoon’s ballgame! With that wonderful combination, the Chicago White Sox split the series against Cleveland!

1

First and foremost, ReyLo only gave up one hit in his complete-game performance! Can we please acknowledge how incredible Reynaldo has been for the second-half of the season!? It’s utter insanity, but I am totally here for it. Keep it up, ReyLo!

3

With his first complete game of the season, López joins Lucas Giolito and Iván Nova as the third White Sox pitcher to throw a complete game in the 2019 season. Funnily enough, it’s a cool 3-2-1 sequence with Gio, Nova, and ReyLo in the quantity of nine-inning games pitched, respectively.

7

For the Sox’s hitting perspective, the Good Guys put up seven runs on the board, and seven guys recorded hits to make that run total possible. Surprisingly enough, Welington Castillo and Adam Engel accounted for five of the seven RBIs. Unsurprisingly, Yolmer Sánchez had the other two RBIs. 🙂

12

The seven runs scored were based off of 12 hits. This offense can be all-or-nothing at times, like our neuron’s action potential, but it sure is fun to watch when the offensive is producing big like this!

22

With 22 games left of the season, this team has the (action) potential to do something great and to keep it interesting for the team and the fans; let’s hope that it happens!

62

The South Siders have accumulated 62 wins, and if they could get to 75, that would definitely be something to end the season with this year. It’s a long-shot goal, but it’s possible.

Six Pack of Stats: Twins 3, White Sox 1

As they say in baseball: Let’s do that baseball! (FanGraphs)


There’s a throwaway gag in Family Guy, where Peter and Lois go to a drive-in movie theater (in a tank, because why not) and watch “The Even Couple” starring Jeff Daniels and Bill Pullman, two mild mannered, evenly tempered actors who you could probably interchange in literally every movie they’ve been in and not notice. This Sox/Twins “thriller” was pretty much like this bit. Two teams performed functional baseball, gave workman-like, professional efforts, and had some moments that moved the needle ever so slightly towards: Meh. Anyway! Here’s your Six Pack of Stats! (brought to you by the number 6)

1+1+1+1+1+1

Both the Twins and White Sox offenses were relatively quiet for most of the night. The Sox could only muster six hits all night. Five singles sprinkled throughout, and one BIG FLY from our very own Tim Anderson that made the game 2-1 in the fourth inning.

Inner-half fastballs don’t usually get hit 400 feet to right center, but (Dr. Malcolm from Jurassic Park voice) Tim … uh … finds a way.

The Twins also had six singles, however the remaining two hits they got were solo homers off of Giolito in the second inning, which ended up being enough tonight!

203

The number of strikeouts for Lucas Giolito so far in the 2019 season, which for those counting at home, makes this the first 200-plus strikeout season of his career. The soon to be AL Cy-Young vote getter didn’t duplicate his dominant performance from last week, but a quality start and nine K’s make for a fine effort.

6th

With his 200-plus K season, Lucas Giolito became the sixth pitcher in franchise history to achieve this feat! The number of 200-plus K pitchers/convicted drug kingpins on this list remains at one, however.

Six feet

That’s how far Steve Stone’s loved ones would have buried him underground had this fifth inning foul ball off the bat of Twins batter Mitch Garver shot into the Sox TV broadcast booth a few inches lower than it did. Thankfully for him (and not so much for NBC Sports Chicago) the monitor just behind his noggin caught the brunt of the damage. Rob Manfred immediately called for the installation of nets to cover all broadcast booths.

.666

The game batting average for one Yolmer Sánchez, who went 2-3 and despite them only being singles, had the highest WPA of all Sox players for the game at .118. (The second single came with one out in the seventh inning, which was the only time the Sox had a man in scoring position with fewer than two out.) Naturally, Matt Skole pinch hit struck out and Leury lined out to Sano to end the last Sox offensive threat of the night.

Y-E-L-I-C-H

Let’s make up for the fact that the last stat was barely worth mentioning, but again, not much exciting happened in this game, one that mattered way more to the Twins than the Sox. So I will instead recognize the reigning NL MVP (and six-letter surnamed) Christian Yelich, who was involved in a one-sided twitter owning of some random troll. Yelly will be featured in ESPN’s The Body Issue and some of his tasteful nudes popped up on Twitter (sorry ladies and gents, no peeks at his Wonderbat) and some random Twitter-MAGAbot named @RoxaneJ77 who claimed to be sad in a now-protected tweet because Yelich “didn’t give a thought about all the kids that idolize him before doing his naked photo shoot.”

Yelich responded simply with a two-worded tweet: “Relax Roxane.”

But did our hero let bygones be bygones? NO, dear reader, he most certainly did not, and owned this troll into an early Twitter grave by doing this:

#RIPRoxane

White Sox are shut out in a well-pitched ballgame

Congratulations, Pito! There wasn’t much offense on the White Sox side, but at least José Abreu passed a milestone. (@WhiteSox)

The Chicago White Sox had three individual player accomplishments for this Saturday Player’s Weekend game, but they did not equate to a Good Guys victory. Two home runs by the Texas Rangers gave them the season series-tying victory (3-3), 4-0. Time to acknowledge the good before the bad:

First and foremost, a huge congratulations are in order for Mal Tiempo (José Abreu)! This storm hit his career 1,000th (and later, 1,001th!) hit, an opposite-field single in the first inning.

Of course, I have to give a shout-out to my guy, Noah Alan (Yolmer Sánchez). Alan recorded a single of his own, which extended his 11-game hitting streak to 12. Let’s keep it going, Noah!

TA7, with a single up the middle in the eighth inning, extended his personal hit streak to 11 games! Let’s keep it rolling!

As for the bulk of the game, Super Nova (Iván Nova) had it going for him. He pitched five scoreless innings as the supernova exploded this evening. However, defying science, the Texas Rangers were able to stop it. In the sixth inning, Osito (Willie Calhoun) hit a no-doubter to the front rows of Goose Island to give his team a 2-0 lead, breaking open the scoring for tonight’s ballgame.

Jimmy Cordero relieved Nova two-outs in the sixth. He escaped the inning without any further damage. However, with two outs in the seventh, Cordero gave up the second two-run blast of the night, to Danielito (Danny Santana). This doubled the Rangers lead to 4-0.

Kolby Allard (Paaa) pitched a fantastic game. 6.1 shutout innings gave Allard a QS in only his fourth career MLB start and seventh game overall.

The overall pitching of the Rangers overpowered any rally-like development, let alone a lone run in a frame for the White Sox. Although they were shut out tonight, look for some hopeful Stick Talk tomorrow!

The South Siders will finish this four-game set against the Rangers tomorrow at 1:10 CT before an off-day on Monday. Reynaldo López (7-11, 5.25 ERA) will pitch against Brock Burke (0-0, 0.00 ERA), in Burke’s second career MLB game. NBC Sports Chicago will have the broadcast, WGN has the radio, and Leigh Allan is back on your South Side Hit Pen coverage!

The sunglasses emoji will have to wait for another day for its SSHP debut…