Today in White Sox History: April 6

Solid as a: Rock Raines was a stalwart in the leadoff spot for the 1993 White Sox. (Pinnacle)


1993
A division championship season began with a night game in Minnesota and a big 10-5 win over the Twins. Tim Raines knocked in three runs on the night. The White Sox would wind up winning the AL West by eight games and compiling 94 victories.

Today in White Sox History: January 10

High hopes: It worked out for most of these guys on the South Side … except Sax, (exit stage) far right.


1992
It was one of the worst deals of White Sox GM Ron Schueler‘s career, as he traded pitcher Melido Perez and two minor leaguers to the Yankees for Steve Sax. Schueler envisioned a devastating 1-2 punch at the top of the order in Tim Raines and Sax, followed by Frank Thomas and Robin Ventura. It never happened, as Sax suddenly forget how to hit and was gone from the team by late April 1994. Making matters worse is that one of the minor league pitchers dealt was Bob Wickman, who’d go on to become a top relief pitcher and All-Star.

Sax did have one moment of glory, as on May 5, 1993 in Milwaukee he made an incredible catch in left field on a ball hit by Billy Doran with the lead run on base. It happened in the eighth inning. Sax broke back and to his left on the drive and caught the ball with his right arm extended. The angle and momentum caused him to tumble over and he lost the ball out of his glove on the way down. Just before hitting the ground, however, Sax snagged the ball with his bare left hand, holding it up to the umpire after he hit the grass. That saved a run, and the Sox won the game, 3-1, on a Ventura home run in the top of the ninth inning.


2002
After one injury-plagued, controversial season with the Sox, pitcher David Wells signed a contract with the Yankees. Wells won only five games in 2001 on the South Side. Naturally, he then turned around and won 61 games over the next four years with New York, San Diego and Boston.

 

Today in White Sox History: December 23

EIC fave: Memories of losing Chet Lemon were softened when Tim Raines came to the White Sox, making one particular fan rather ecstatic. (Baseball Digest)


1990
White Sox fans got an early Christmas gift as new GM Ron Schueler made one of his best deals, sending outfielder Ivan Calderon and pitcher Barry Jones to Montreal for All-Star left fielder and stolen base threat Tim Raines and pitcher Jeff Carter. Montreal first insisted on Melido Perez in the deal, but were talked down after Schueler made a trade for Cory Snyder, lessening Chicago’s outfield needs.

Raines would provide speed at the top of the order, swiping 143 bases in his five years with the Sox. He hit .444 in the 1993 ALCS against Toronto.

Today in White Sox History: September 14

Rubber arm: “15 innings of work, skip? No problem!”

Sept. 14, 1952 — In a 17-inning game in Chicago, White Sox pitcher Saul Rogovin struck out 14 Boston Red Sox in 15 innings of work. But it was Luis Aloma who got the decision as the White Sox won, 4-3.


Sept. 14, 1974 — White Sox first baseman Dick Allen called a team meeting and announced he was retiring from baseball. Allen, the controversial slugger, would win the American League home run title despite missing the final two weeks of the season. Allen was fighting serious injuries to his shoulder and leg from previous seasons, but the way he “walked out” on the Sox left a bad taste in the mouths of many fans. White Sox GM Roland Hemond traded Allen’s rights to the Atlanta Braves for a player to be named later (interestingly, only after Allen had been traded a second time, to Philadelphia in May 1975, did the White Sox-Braves trade get completed … with one of the players Atlanta acquired from the Phillies, catcher Jim Essian!). Allen would un-retire and see action with the Phillies and Oakland A’s before retiring for good after the 1977 season.


Sept. 14, 1997 — Carlton Fisk had his uniform No. 72 retired in a ceremony before the White Sox took on Cleveland. The game was also remembered for manager Terry Bevington going to the mound to make a pitching change … with no one was warming up in the bullpen when he called for the change! (The White Sox had a 3-0 lead at the time, and Bevington’s blunder of pulling a pitcher with a cold bullpen led Cleveland rallying to win, 8-3.)


Sept. 14, 2017 — It was a record-setting afternoon for a couple of White Sox players in the team’s 17-7 blowout of the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park. Sox outfielder Avisaíl García went 5-for-5 with seven RBIs and two runs scored in the game, in addition to a walk. White Sox rookie second baseman Yoán Moncada went 4-for-5 with two walks and five runs scored, and first baseman José Abreu went 4-for-5 with three runs scored.

García became the second White Sox player with five hits and seven RBI in a game since at least 1913. The other was Carl Reynolds, at the New York Yankees on July 2, 1930. Moncada, meanwhile, tied Hall-of-Famer Tim Raines‘s franchise record with the five runs scored. Raines originally set the record against the Red Sox in Boston on April 18, 1994.

The Sox as a team pounded out 25 hits in the game.


Today in White Sox History: September 2

Best day ever: Buck Weaver could hardly make an out, 101 years ago today. (Wikipedia)


Sept. 2, 1918 — In a season-ending (the 1918 season ended early because of World War I) doubleheader at Detroit, George “Buck” Weaver rapped out eight hits in 10 at-bats. The Sox would lose to the Tigers, 11-5 and 7-3. Weaver went 5-for-5 in the first game and 3-for-5 in the nightcap.


Sept. 2, 1937 — In a game at Comiskey Park, Sox third baseman LouBoze” Berger and outfielder Mike Kreevich led off the bottom of the first with back-to-back home runs. It was the first time that ever happened in team history. The Sox beat the Boston Red Sox, 4-2.


Sept. 2, 1970 — One of the key dates in franchise history marks Roland Hemond being hired as player personnel director to rebuild the White Sox. The club would go on to lose a team-record 106 games in 1970. The very next year, the South Siders improved by 23 games, from 56 to 79 wins, and by 1972 would be a legitimate title contender. Hemond would eventually become GM, staying with the team through 1985. Hemond brought along, as new field manager, Chuck Tanner. Tanner would be named Manager of the Year in 1972.


Sept. 2, 1995Tim Raines had his American League record of 40 consecutive steals snapped when he was thrown out in the third inning. Toronto’s Randy Knorr was the catcher who ended the streak, during the 10-4 White Sox win over the Blue Jays.