Today in White Sox History: December 1

Sandlot ball: The White Sox saw Luis Alvarado playing in a parking lot and said, “Hey, let’s trade Luis Aparicio for this guy!” (Topps)


1956 — With the first of many awards he would win in his Hall of Fame career, Luis Aparicio became the first Venezuelan to ever win the Rookie of the Year Award. Aparicio led the AL in steals with 21 and played a stellar defensive game, leading the league in putouts and assists as well as in games and innings played. Aparicio picked up 22 of the 24 possible votes. He beat out Cleveland’s Rocky Colavito (who would join the Sox in 1967) and Baltimore’s Tito Francona (who also would be a member of the White Sox, for part of the 1958 campaign).


1964 — The Sox traded pitcher Frank Baumann to the Cubs for catcher Jimmie Schaffer. It was the first time the two Chicago clubs made a direct trade with each other.


1970 — For the second and final time, the White Sox traded Luis Aparicio. The future Hall of Fame shortstop was sent to the Red Sox for infielders Luis Alvarado and Mike Andrews. Those players helped the Sox in the early 1970s, but this is one Roland Hemond trade that some have second-guessed. In 1972, if Aparicio was around to provide some stability to the infield, the White Sox may have taken the Western Division title. Lee “Bee-Bee” Richards, Alvarado and Rich Morales simply weren’t the answer at shortstop that season.


1998 — Popular and proficient third baseman Robin Ventura signed a free agent contract with the Mets. Ventura, who was an outspoken critic of the “White Flag” trade, won five Gold Gloves in his time on the South Side in addition to hitting 171 home runs. He had six seasons with at least 90 RBIs and hit .280 or better for five seasons. He’d return in 2012 to begin a five-year tenure as manager.

 

 

 

Today in White Sox History: September 13

Casual day: White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf kicks back to watch the Marlins and Expos at Sox Park in 2004. (Wikipedia)


Sept. 13, 1967 — In one of the longest games in franchise history and in the middle of a four-team pennant race, the White Sox shut out Cleveland 1-0 in 17 innings! (Now that’s pitching!)

The game lasted more than four and a half hours and was finally finished when Rocky Colavito singled to right, driving home Buddy Bradford. One other note from this game, Sox starter Gary Peters allowed one hit in 11 innings, striking out seven … and he also walked 10! (I wonder what his pitch count was!)

Don McMahon, the fourth Sox pitcher, picked up the relief win. (It’s notable that on at least one occasion this season, White Sox manager Ricky Renteria has used four pitchers in one inning.)


Sept. 13, 1987 — In a game in Seattle, White Sox pitcher Floyd Bannister fired a one-hitter in winning 2-0. Harold Reynolds’ two-out single to left in the first inning was the only baserunner on the night for the Mariners, and ironically he was thrown out trying to stretch the hit to a double! Bannister faced the minimum 27 hitters and struck out 10.


Sept. 13, 2004 — Due to hurricane Ivan, U.S. Cellular Field hosted the first two games of a series between the Montreal Expos and Florida Marlins. It was the first time a National League team played a regular season “home” game in an American League park since 1946.