Crede, Konerko power the White Sox to a 3-1 win

Doubling up: Joe Crede drove in the first run of the game with a double to center field. (@TheSoxSide)

While there were 25 hits in this game, there were only four runs. Timely hitting was hard to come by, but the White Sox found just enough, while the Twins did not.

Both teams got off to a slow start offensively, though hitters weren’t exactly overpowered by starters Orlando Hernández and Brad Radke. During the first four innings, nobody scored, though scoring threats were plentiful. In the bottom of the first, the White Sox managed to put runners on the corners with no outs, but Radke escaped the jam. In the top of the second, the Twins put runners on the corners with no outs, but Hernández wiggled out of it. In the fourth, the Twins put runners on first and second, but Michael Cuddyer grounded into a 6-4-3 double play. In the fifth, the Twins put runners on the corners with two outs, but a 1-3 groundout ended it, so the score remained 0-0.

In the bottom of the fifth, the White Sox finally broke the ice. A.J. Pierzynski led off with a single, which set the table for Joe Crede. Crede hit a line drive to deep center, which Torii Hunter made an uncharacteristically poor read on. Initially, Hunter started running in on Crede’s liner, which made it impossible for him to make the catch. Pierzynski scored, and Crede ended up at second. Crede went on to score on a sacrifice fly by Scott Podsednik to make it 2-0.

In the sixth, the Twins squandered a scoring opportunity yet again, and Paul Konerko added an insurance run with a solo homer. Incredibly, Konerko already has seven home runs this season, and he is slashing .260/.315/.700.

The bullpen did a great job holding the Twins’ bats in check, so the White Sox did not need any more insurance. Southpaw Damaso Marte retired the only two batters he faced to record the save, his first of the year. The only hiccup for the bullpen came when Shingo Takatsu allowed a double to Shannon Stewart and a single to Matt LeCroy. LeCroy’s RBI single resulted in the Twins’ only run.

Don’t look now, but after this victory, the White Sox have the best record in the American League (10-4). Meanwhile, the Twins have sole possession of second place in the AL Central (8-6). Tomorrow (April 20, 2005), the White Sox will open a two-game series at Comerica Park, as they will take on the Tigers. Jon Garland and Wil Ledezma will be the probable starting pitchers.

Let’s take a look at a couple of trivia questions, shall we?

  1. Tonight, Orlando Hernández allowed 10 hits but did not allow any runs. No White Sox pitcher has done that since 1984. Who was that 1984 pitcher?
  2. This player, who led the 1983 AL West champions in stolen bases, also led them in postseason hits.

Answers

  1. Richard Dotson (To be exact, Dotson allowed 11 hits and somehow escaped every jam unscathed)
  2. Rudy Law (77 stolen bases that year, which is still a franchise record, and it will probably stand for a very long time)

Today in White Sox History: December 22

Clutch work in Beantown: El Duque spun the most storied inning of the 21st Century for the White Sox in the ALDS. (YouTube)


2004
As part of a plan to add more depth to the rotation, the White Sox signed veteran hurler Orlando “El Duque” Hernandez. “The Duke” started strong in 2005, faded somewhat down the stretch, but pitched perhaps the most historic inning in franchise history when he came in to a bases-loaded, no-out situation at Boston in Game 3 of the ALDS. He proceeded to get two pop outs and a strikeout as the Sox held on to win and advance to the ALCS.

 

 

Today in White Sox History: October 7

El Duque with a dagger: In a postseason filled with memorable pitching performances, Hernandez’s in Game 3 of the 2005 ALDS was the best. (@WhiteSox)


2001 — White Sox All-Star outfielder Magglio Ordoñez became the first player in American League history to have a season with a .300 average, 40 doubles, 30 home runs, 100 RBIs and 25 stolen bases. He doubled against the Minnesota Twins for his 40th of the season — and the milestone.


2005 — At Fenway Park, the White Sox won their first postseason series of any kind since 1917 by beating Boston, 5-3, to sweep the ALDS in three games. Paul Konerko’s two-run home run gave the Sox some breathing room — and then pitcher Orlando Hernandez saved the game. Entering a bases-loaded, no-out, one-run lead situation in the sixth inning, El Duque got two pop outs and a strikeout. It was an amazing performance.