Today in White Sox History: November 9

Capping it off: Guillén took home a big award after the World Series. (Keith Allison/Wikipedia)


2005 — After a season that saw the White Sox win their first World Series title since 1917, the Baseball Writers Association of America awarded the Manager of the Year award to Ozzie Guillén. Guillén, the former Sox All-Star shortstop, guided the team to a wire-to-wire Central Division title with 99 wins; they then went 11-1 in the postseason, capping it off with a sweep of Houston for the championship. Ozzie picked up 17 first-place votes and 105 total points to beat out Cleveland’s Eric Wedge. Wedge got six first-place votes and 71 points, while the Yankees Joe Torre was third with 43 points.

Today in White Sox History: November 8


2000 — On the basis of an unexpected Central Division championship and 95-win season, Sox skipper Jerry Manuel was named the Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America. He ran away with the award, beating out Art Howe of Oakland, 134-74. Manuel got 25 first-place votes out of a possible 28.

Today in White Sox History: November 3

Big win: All his early work with the White Sox paid off, as La Russa took home Manager of the Year hardware in 1983. (Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation)


1983Tony La Russa, who guided the White Sox to a 99-win season and their first playoff appearance in 24 years, was named the Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America. It was the first year the organization handed out that award. La Russa received 17 of a possible 28 votes to take the honor. He beat out the Orioles Joe Altobelli, who picked up seven first-place votes. La Russa also would take Manager of the Year honors from The Sporting News and the Associated Press.


1988 — The Sox named Jeff Torborg as the team’s new field manager. Torborg, a former major league catcher, and Indians manager, gained notable success with the club. His team and family philosophy took hold, and a young group of players stunned the baseball world by winning 94 games in 1990. (Torborg would be named Manager of the Year that season.)  He followed up that year by winning 87 games in 1991 before being forced out by GM Ron Schueler, who wanted to hire his own man.

Torborg, by the way, is the only man in baseball history to have caught a perfect game from Sandy Koufax and a no-hitter from Nolan Ryan, as he played for the Dodgers and Angels from 1964 through 1973.

Today in White Sox History: October 26

(Chicago Tribune)


1931 — Sox founder and owner Charles Comiskey died in his home in Eagle River, Wis. He left his entire estate to his son J. Louis Comiskey, including the White Sox. His estate was valued at more than $1.5 million dollars at the time., the equivalent of $17 million today.


1993 — White Sox manager Gene Lamont, who guided the team to its first postseason appearance in 10 years, was named American League Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA). Lamont would beat out Buck Showalter of the Yankees for the honor. Lamont got 72 total points to Showalter’s 63. Lamont picked up eight first place votes to seven for Showalter.


1994 — Even though his quest for the Triple Crown was cut short by the labor impasse shutting down baseball six weeks early, Frank Thomas still did enough to garner his second straight MVP award from the BBWAA. Thomas outdistanced future Sox outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. and future teammate Albert Belle, finishing with 24 first place votes out of a possible 28. He ended up with 372 points to Griffey’s 233 and Belle’s 225.

In 113 games, Thomas hit .353 with 38 home runs, 101 RBIs, 106 runs and 109 walks. With the award, Thomas became the first back-to-back AL winner since Roger Maris in 1960 and 1961.


2005 — On this night in Houston, the Sox became World Series champions for the first time since 1917. Freddy Garcia and three relief pitchers shut out the Astros on five hits, 1-0, sweeping the best-of-seven series in four games. The Sox shut out Houston for the final 15 innings of Series play.

Outfielder Jermaine Dye drove in the game’s only run and was named the World Series MVP. The South Side exploded in an orgy of delight, as fans celebrated all over the area.

“stockyard workers … “