Today in White Sox History: October 26

(Chicago Tribune)


1931 — Sox founder and owner Charles Comiskey died in his home in Eagle River, Wis. He left his entire estate to his son J. Louis Comiskey, including the White Sox. His estate was valued at more than $1.5 million dollars at the time., the equivalent of $17 million today.


1993 — White Sox manager Gene Lamont, who guided the team to its first postseason appearance in 10 years, was named American League Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA). Lamont would beat out Buck Showalter of the Yankees for the honor. Lamont got 72 total points to Showalter’s 63. Lamont picked up eight first place votes to seven for Showalter.


1994 — Even though his quest for the Triple Crown was cut short by the labor impasse shutting down baseball six weeks early, Frank Thomas still did enough to garner his second straight MVP award from the BBWAA. Thomas outdistanced future Sox outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. and future teammate Albert Belle, finishing with 24 first place votes out of a possible 28. He ended up with 372 points to Griffey’s 233 and Belle’s 225.

In 113 games, Thomas hit .353 with 38 home runs, 101 RBIs, 106 runs and 109 walks. With the award, Thomas became the first back-to-back AL winner since Roger Maris in 1960 and 1961.


2005 — On this night in Houston, the Sox became World Series champions for the first time since 1917. Freddy Garcia and three relief pitchers shut out the Astros on five hits, 1-0, sweeping the best-of-seven series in four games. The Sox shut out Houston for the final 15 innings of Series play.

Outfielder Jermaine Dye drove in the game’s only run and was named the World Series MVP. The South Side exploded in an orgy of delight, as fans celebrated all over the area.

“stockyard workers … “

Today in White Sox History: September 28


Sept. 28, 1932J. Louis Comiskey, the new owner and son of Charles Comiskey, tried to rebuild his franchise by sending $150,000 (an unheard-of sum in those days) to the Philadelphia A’s for infielder Jimmy Dykes, outfielder Al Simmons and utility man George “Mule” Haas.

Simmons would become a member of the Hall of Fame in 1953, and in three seasons with the Sox twice drove in more than 100 RBIs. Dykes would eventually manage the team for more than 12 full seasons, beginning in 1934. He had five winning years and one season at .500 in that time, by Brett Ballantini’s managerial WAR the best manager in White Sox history.


Sept. 28, 1953 — The White Sox beat the St. Louis Browns, 3-2, behind Billy Pierce. It was the last American League game ever played in St. Louis, as the Browns moved to Baltimore after the season.


Sept. 28, 1959 — The White Sox team photo appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated. The caption read: “Chicago’s New Champions Sit For Their Portrait.”


Sept. 28, 1997 Frank Thomas won the batting championship with a .347 average. He joined Luke Appling as the only White Sox players to do this. Thomas was one of only a handful of players in major league history with a batting title and at least 450 home runs to their credit. Thomas was also the largest player (both in height and weight) to ever win a batting crown.


Sept. 28, 2003 — White Sox starter Esteban Loaiza recorded his 21st win of the season, beating the Royals 5-1. The 21 wins tied the major league record for the most wins in a season by a pitcher born in Mexico. Loaiza tied the mark set by Fernando Valenzuela in 1986.