South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect 47: Ronaldo Guzman

Is Ronaldo Guzman in the dugout way over there? It’s theoretically possible. If not, well, it’s tough finding photos of a 17-year-old DSL ace.



Ronaldo Guzman
Left-Handed Starting Pitcher
6´0´´
150 pounds
Age: 17
SSHP rank among all left-handed starting pitchers in the system: 4
2020 South Side Sox Top Prospect Vote: 44

Ronaldo Guzman, a native of the Dominican Republic, received a $75,000 signing bonus on Oct. 29, 2018, which may turn out to be the best under-the-radar signing of an international pitcher ever for the White Sox. In 2019, his first taste of professional ball, Guzman posted a 4.53 ERA and 1.39 WHIP in 14 outings (12 starts) spanning 51 ⅔ innings. In those innings, he relinquished 43 hits (.221) and 29 walks (12.8%) while striking out a whopping 76 (33.5%). While those numbers are outstanding for someone who didn’t turn 17 until late August, Guzman’s numbers would’ve been even better if not for one bad relief outing; you throw that bad boy away and you get an 3.53 ERA and 1.29 WHIP. Keep in mind, also, that Guzman was approximately 2.3 years younger than the DSL average. Certainly his walks were an issue, in addition to a low ground ball rate (37.9%). With his youth, however, Guzman has plenty of time to work on those things.

Ben Badler of Baseball America said this of Guzman prior to this season: “fastball that gets up to 89 mph with easy arm action and an athletic delivery that repeats well to throw strikes with an advanced changeup for his age.” As Guzman gets older, you’d expect him to gain more height and weight, which can only help with durability and velocity. Guzman has a crazy-high ceiling.

While it wouldn’t be a complete shock if Guzman returns to the DSL White Sox for the 2020 season due to his age, he seems a great bet to begin the season with the AZL affiliate instead.

 

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect 60: Elijah Tatís

Slow start: Tatís had a short pro debut but should still see the States in 2020. (@BenBadler)



Elijah Tatís
Second Baseman
5´11´´
155 pounds
Age: 18
SSHP rank among all second basemen in the system: 4

Elijah is the son of former major leaguer Fernando Tatís and the brother of former Sox farmhand Fernando Tatís Jr. According to Jesse Sanchez of MLB.com, “Tatís possesses a strong and accurate arm and has impressed scouts with the way the ball jumps off his bat, as well as his ability to square up fastballs.” With that kind of ability, the White Sox were happy to sign him with a $500,000 bonus on 2019’s International Signing Day.

Tatís struggled out of the gate for the DSL White Sox this year, however, and only managed to slash .187/.300/.213 in 25 games with two doubles, 10 RBIs, five stolen bases, 13 walks (14.4%) and 16 strikeouts (17.8%). Largely because defensive wizard Yolbert Sánchez played shortstop for the DSL squad, Tatís actually played a bit more at second base this year than would’ve been expected. Eventually, as he gets older and bulks up, Tatís is expected to eventually have the power to be an everyday third baseman. Despite him actually having a lower OPS this year than the aforementioned Cesar Jiménez, expect Tatís to be promoted to the AZL squad for 2020 due to his much higher ceiling.

 

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect 67: Manuel Veloz

Fast learner: Just days after signing with the White Sox, Veloz was on his way to being the best relief pitcher in the DSL.



Manuel Veloz
Right-Handed Relief Pitcher
6´2´´
185 pounds
Age: 19
SSHP rank among all right-handed relief pitchers in the system: 11

 

Manuel Veloz, a native Venezuelan, not only enjoyed the most success of any reliever for the DSL White Sox this year, but may have actually posted the best season of any White Sox reliever in 2019. He actually signed an international contract with the White Sox just a couple of weeks before the DSL season started. In 15 outings (one start), Veloz posted an incredible 0.91 ERA and 0.81 WHIP in 39 ⅔ innings. In those frames, he allowed just 25 hits (.179 OBA) and seven walks (4.7%) while striking out 42 (28.2%).

According to Baseball-Reference, Veloz was 0.3 years younger than the average Dominican League player, so he wasn’t pitching against far less experienced players. If this mystery man continues to pitch this well next year, Veloz could move up the ladder relatively quickly. Assuming he’s got a decent fastball based on his above-average strikeout rate, Veloz has shown excellent control and kept the ball down (64.5% ground ball rate) — those are terrific ingredients for success. Expect Veloz to begin the 2020 season with the AZL White Sox.

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect 71: Johnabiell Laureano

J.L. is not pictured: But this is a field he indeed played on in the DSL.



Johnabiell Laureano
Center Fielder
6´0´´
180 pounds
Age: 19
SSHP rank among all center fielders in the system: 7

A native of San Pedro de Macoris in the Dominican Republic, which is arguably the most famous baseball community in the world, Johnabiell Laureano received an international signing bonus from the White Sox in February 2018. In his first taste of baseball in 2018, at about nine months younger than his average competitor, Laureano slashed just .220/.329/.262 in 65 games with nine doubles, 13 RBIs, four stolen bases, 31 walks (12.3%) and 54 strikeouts (21.4%).

The 2019 season was a much different story in his return to the DSL, as Laureano slashed an impressive .357/.437/.543 in 59 games with 15 doubles, three triples, six homers, 36 RBIs, six stolen bases, 28 walks (11.4%) and 43 strikeouts (17.5%). His OPS this year was better than everyone in the Sox organization not named Luis Robert, and he did it while performing in the shadow of the highly-esteemed Benyamin Bailey.

Certainly there are some red flags, as Laureano’s strikeout-to-walk ratio will likely get worse with each new level he advances into. Also, he was a tad bit older (three months) than his competition this year, which doesn’t sound like much but it can make a big difference in how he’s viewed by scouts. It’s quite possible that Laureano may prove to have more polish than some of his DSL counterparts. We should find out more next year, as he’s expected to begin the season with the AZL Sox.      

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect No. 87: Jefferson Mendoza

It’s true: DSL images can be hard to come by.


Jefferson Mendoza
Catcher
6´0´´
170 pounds
Age: 19
SSHP rank among all catchers in the system: 5 

Another catcher from Venezuela, Jefferson Mendoza signed with the White Sox on International Signing Day on July 2, 2017. International Scouting Director Marco Paddy said of Mendoza at the time, “Jefferson is a plus defensive catcher with an excellent frame for the position. His abilities to handle a pitching staff and call a game should help him develop quickly.”

Mendoza struggled through his first season with the DSL White Sox in 2018 as he slashed just .207/.289/.289 in 121 at-bats by hitting seven doubles, one homer, 15 RBIs, one stolen base, 12 walks (8.9%) and 26 strikeouts (19.3%).

With a year under his belt, Mendoza picked up his offensive game this year in his return to the DSL. In 33 games encompassing 95 at-bats, he slashed .305/.391/.484 with eight doubles, three homers, 21 RBIs, one stolen base, 10 walks (9.1%) and 28 strikeouts (25.5%). Unlike in 2018 where he curtailed the running game by thwarting 46.2% of stolen base attempts, Mendoza was only successful doing so 16.3% of the time in 2019. On the plus side, after 12 passed balls in 2018, he allowed nary a one in 2019.

Mendoza should begin the 2020 season in the AZL White Sox, but with so many catchers there, it’ll be interesting to see where he will play.

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect No. 88: Wilber Sánchez

When you’re so young and so talented: You make the Top 100 without available art. (@MiLB)


Wilber Sánchez
Shortstop
5´10´´
160 pounds
Age: 18
SSHP rank among all shortstops in the system: 7 

Wilber Sánchez, a native of Venezuela, received a signing bonus from the White Sox last February, to little fanfare. With that said, despite the fact that he was the lesser-known Sánchez on the DSL squad, he still found a way to make a name for himself. In 52 games totaling 177 at-bats, Sánchez slashed .288/.391/.395 with 13 doubles, three triples, 25 RBIs, 13 stolen bases, 28 walks (13.5%) and 33 strikeouts (15.9%). Interestingly, he fared far better versus righties (.304/.416/.415) than he did southpaws (.238/.304/.333). Sánchez was about seven months younger than his competition, so there’s nothing fluky about his stats. When Yolbert joined the team later in the season, Wilber moved over to second base, where he played fairly well. He made a combined 13 errors this year, which could likely be attributable to his youth and perhaps the quality of the playing field. Sánchez should be ready for a promotion to the AZL squad in 2020.

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect No. 91: Cristian Mena

Fortunate sign: Mena hasn’t pitched a pro inning, but his future seems as promising as any. (@BenBadler)


Cristian Mena
Right-Handed Starting Pitcher
6´3´´
180 pounds
Age: 17
SSHP rank among all right-handed starting pitchers in the system: 13

Mena, who didn’t even turn 17 until December, could be next year’s right-handed version of Ronaldo Guzman for the DSL White Sox. Mena didn’t pitch for the DSL Sox this year, but should join the rotation in 2020. He struck out six of the 11 batters he faced at the Mejia Top 10 Showcase in Las Vegas, and threw 86-88 mph at the event with a devastating curveball, according to Ben Badler of Baseball America.

South Side Hit Pen Top Prospect No. 96: Ruben Benavides

Too young: for any photography, let’s just say that Benevides hopes to fill this White Sox catcher’s helmet one day. (Slugger.com)


Ruben Benavides
Catcher
6´1´´

178 pounds
Age: 18
SSHP rank among all catchers in the system: 6
Top Prospect ranking a year ago: N/R

About a month after the 2018 DSL season was over, Venezuela native Benavides signed an international contract with the White Sox. Because the DSL White Sox actually had five catchers on its roster this year, each backstop had relatively little playing time behind the plate. However, because of Benavides’ bat, he played in another 10 games as DH. Overall, in 22 games this year totaling 66 at-bats, Benavides slashed an impressive .348/.425/.606 with eight doubles, three triples, 12 RBIs, two stolen bases, nine walks (11.3%) and 14 strikeouts (17.5%). In his 12 games behind the dish, he threw out 4-of-14 attempted basestealers (28.6%) but had four passed balls. It will be interesting to see if he can carry that offense Stateside.

Deep Dive: Rookie league right fielders

In case of emergency: Logan Glass was one of the most intriguing selections of this year’s MLB draft by the White Sox. (@BFeldo14)


“Deep Dive” focuses on the depth of each position in the Chicago White Sox organization. Each position is broken into a five-part series:

  1. Depth in the rookie levels (Dominican through Great Falls)
  2. Depth in A-ball (Kannapolis and Winston-Salem)
  3. Depth in the higher levels (Birmingham and Charlotte)
  4. Under the Radar-type detail on one of the White Sox players at that position
  5. Free agent options at that position

While there aren’t a lot of household names among RF rookie leaguers, there is an incredible amount of untapped talent in this class. Five of these six players will be younger than 20 when this season starts, and there’s serious power potential in the likes of Luis Mieses, Logan Glass and Josue Guerrero. This will be a fun group to watch in 2020.  

(age as of April 1, 2020)


Great Falls Voyagers

Luis Mieses
6´3´´
180 pounds
B/T: L/L
Other positions played: Left field, Center field
Age: 19

Just over a month after turning 16, Dominican native Mieses received a signing bonus from the White Sox on July 2, 2016 for $428,000, as part of a large International Signing Day class that included Josue Guerrero, Lenyn Sosa, Anderson Comas and Kleyder Sanchez among others. Mieses began professional ball with the DSL squad in 2017, and slashed .263/.302/.320 in 59 games with eight doubles, three triples, 25 RBIs, three stolen bases, 10 walks (3.8%) and 42 strikeouts (16.0%). It was enough to receive a promotion stateside for 2018, when he slashed .226/.236/.328 in 48 games with the AZL squad with 10 doubles, two triples, two homers, 26 RBIs, three stolen bases, four walks (2.0%) and 35 strikeouts (17.2%).

Mieses’ numbers improved a bit this year with Great Falls, although it could be attributed in part to the thinner air. In 59 games for the Voyagers, he slashed .241/.264/.359 with 14 doubles, four homers, 28 RBIs, seven walks (3.0%) and 46 strikeouts (19.9%). The production has been a bit disappointing, unless you consider that Mieses has been more than a year younger than his competition at every level he’s played thus far.

He currently ranks 29th among all White Sox prospects per MLB Pipeline with a 60 grade on his throwing arm, 50 grades for fielding and power, 45 for hit and 40 for running. Pitch selection has been Mieses’ biggest issue, which is evidenced by his extremely low walk numbers. While Mieses really should return to Great Falls for 2020, it wouldn’t be surprising to see him promoted to Kannapolis, for two reasons: He will be eligible for the Rule 5 draft in 2020, so the White Sox would like to see what he can do in full-season play; also, the White Sox may want to make room in Great Falls for some of the remaining right fielders on this list. 

Bryan Connell 
6´3´´

195 pounds
B/T: R/R
Age: 21

On International Signing Day of 2015, Connell (a native of Panama) joined the Milwaukee Brewers. In his first two years (2016-17) with the Brewers DSL squad, he however, he hit just a paltry .189 and .177. In his third year for the team, he finally hit his stride and .256/.408/.512 in 27 games. With that effort, he was promoted to Helena, where he slashed .219/.288/.342 in 21 games before being traded with pitcher Johan Dominguez to the White Sox for southpaw reliever Xavier Cedeño on August 31. He remained in the Pioneer League to play three games with Great Falls before year’s end.  

The 2019 season wasn’t much to write home about for Connell. In 29 games totaling 92 at-bats, he slashed just .163/.238/.380 with two doubles, six homers, 13 RBIs, seven walks (6.9%) and 45 strikeouts (44.6%). On the plus side, he has shown impressive power when he’s been able to connect. On the down side, he’s struck out 36% of the time during his career with a lifetime .190/.298/.325 slash line. He was about six months younger than his competition this year, but that will change if asked to return to Great Falls for 2020.


Arizona League White Sox

Logan Glass
6´4´´
215 pounds
B/T: R/R
Other positions played: Center field, Left field
Age: 18

With his build, Glass was quite the physical specimen for his Mustang H.S. (Okla.) varsity squad. According to Prep Baseball Report, he’s got a great arm and throws 92 mph from the mound, and his speed is better than average as he runs the 60-yard-dash in 6.65. Also, according to PBR, his exit velocity sits at 96 mph, which is quite impressive. Glass was verbally committed to Kansas, so the White Sox had to pry him from out of it after selecting him in the 22nd round of the 2019 draft. In 17 games for the AZL squad this year, Glass slashed an impressive .284/.342/.403 with five doubles, one homer, nine RBIs, one stolen base, two walks (2.7%) and 23 strikeouts (31.5%). The low walk and high strikeout rates are slightly concerning but understandable considering he played against competition 16 months older than he, in addition to factoring in his acclimation to the speed of the game. He likely will remain in the AZL to begin 2020, but should an early promotion to Great Falls if he gets off to a solid start.  

Josue Guerrero
6´2´´

190 pounds
B/T: R/R
Other positions played: Left field
Age: 20

Guerrero was the biggest and highest-profile signing of 2016’s International Signing Day for the White Sox. With more than nine players signed, his signing bonus ($1.2 million) and his pedigree (nephew of Vladimir, Sr. and cousin of Vladimir Jr.) and much had been expected of him as a result. However, his progress has been slowed due to inconsistencies at the plate. For his first professional year in 2017, Guerrero slashed .222/.290/.348 for the DSL squad in 55 games with 13 doubles, two triples, three homers, 25 RBIs, five stolen bases, 16 walks (6.9%) and 54 strikeouts (23.3%). He played for the AZL squad in 2018, but struggled immensely in part to a lack of playing time due to a crowded outfield. With the AZL Sox, he slashed just .192/.231/.288 in 23 games with five doubles, one triple, eight RBIs, three walks (3.8%) and 27 strikeouts (34.6%). 

With more consistent playing time this year, Guerrero began to find his rhythm. For the year with the AZL Sox, he slashed .240/.307/.404 in 43 games with nine doubles, five homers, 20 RBIs, 13 walks (7.8%) and 55 strikeouts (33.1%). In the final half of the year, however, he slashed a respectable .274/.333/.488 with improved walk and strikeout rates. Hopefully, something clicked for him and he can build upon that momentum for next year.

At the time of his signing three years ago, Baseball America said of him, “He is a strongly built corner outfielder whose best tool is his raw power. He’s 6-foot-2, 190 pounds with good strength now and the frame that suggests potential to become even more physical. It’s not huge raw power right now, but he has good bat speed from the right side and the ball jumps off his bat with good exit velocity when he makes contact.” Like Mieses and Glass, there’s still enough to dream on here. Expect Guerrero to begin 2020 with Great Falls, but receive a promotion to Kannapolis by year’s end if all goes well.   

Chase Krogman 
5´11´´

180 pounds
B/T: L/L
Other positions played: Left field
Age: 19

Krogman, a native of the St. Louis area, played ball for Wentzville Liberty H.S. (Mo.). He certainly may have drawn the interest of area scouts, as he played for the Chi-Town Cream last summer. According to Baseball Factory, “At the dish, he has a repeatable swing path and stays compact with the barrel. He sprays the ball to all fields and created fast bat speed with his smooth rhythm/timing.”

Krogman has a good arm, but because he doesn’t have blazing speed (he ran the 60-yard-dash in 7.02 per Perfect Game), he may be relegated to the corners. He has performed on the mound in front of scouts and posted an 83 mph fastball, along with a 72-74 mph curveball and changeup according to Prep Baseball Report. However, it’s with the bat that his future will lie. When this Missouri State commit was selected in the 34th round by the White Sox in the 34th round, it wasn’t clear whether or not he’d sign. However, with a $190,000 signing bonus, the White Sox were able to reel him in.

Krogman struggled in what little playing time he had with the AZL Sox in 2019, with four singles, a walk, and six strikeouts in 21 official at-bats. Expect him to receive much more playing time with the AZL Sox for the 2020 campaign. 


DSL White Sox

Roberth Gutierrez
6´0´´
170 pounds
B/T: R/R
Other positions played: Center field, Left field
Age: 18

As a 17-year-old native of Maracay, Venezuela, Gutierrez’s first taste of professional ball came this year, and he acquitted himself relatively well by slashing .274/.365/.378 in 47 games with four doubles, five triples, 15 RBIs, seven stolen bases, 21 walks (15.6%) and 33 strikeouts (24.4%). He had nine assists as opposed to two errors, so it appears he has a solid arm. His numbers get lost when compared to the DSL squad’s other two outfielders (Benyamin Bailey and Johnabiell Laureano), but while he may not have the higher ceiling of those two guys, Gutierrez seems to fit the bill of a reserve outfielder due to his lack of power and game-changing speed. While he may return to the DSL team to begin the 2020 season, Gutierrez should earn a shot for promotion to the AZL squad before the end of the year.


 

Deep Dive: Rookie league center fielders

The Flash: James Beard, who ran the 60-yard-dash in just 6.21 seconds, may just be the fastest man in baseball. (@MLBPDP) 


“Deep Dive” focuses on the depth of each position in the Chicago White Sox organization. Each position is broken into a five-part series:

  1. Depth in the rookie levels (Dominican through Great Falls)
  2. Depth in A-ball (Kannapolis and Winston-Salem)
  3. Depth in the higher levels (Birmingham and Charlotte)
  4. Under the Radar-type detail on one of the White Sox players at that position
  5. Free agent options at that position

These four prospects have yet to reach drinking age. While James Beard may be the most highly touted of these guys due in large part to his blazing speed, the other three center fielders are emerging prospects as well. All are tremendous athletes with above-average speed.

(age as of April 1, 2020)


Great Falls Voyagers

Caberea Weaver
6´3´´
180 pounds
B/T: R/R
Age: 20

Weaver was an amazing athlete out of South Gwinnett, Ga. In fact, Perfect Game ranked him as the 14th-best high school outfielder in the 2018 draft class in part due to his projectable bat and running the 60-yard dash in 6.27 seconds on a slow track. Baseball America said of him at the time of the draft, “He is an athletic, wiry outfielder with impressive athleticism that should allow him to become an above-average defender in center field. There is a lot of rawness in Weaver’s current game, both offensively and defensively. At the plate, Weaver has a whippy, quick bat and present strength that should continue to improve as he fills out.” The White Sox selected him in the seventh round, and it took a $226,200 signing bonus to pry Weaver from his commitment to the University of Georgia. 

In 2018 with the AZL squad, Weaver slashed .248/.367/.342 in 50 games with five doubles, three triples, one homer, 11 RBIs, eight stolen bases, 18 walks (10.0%) and 52 strikeouts (28.9%). This year with Great Falls, he posted similar numbers as he slashed .254/.317/.377 in 62 games with 13 doubles, five triples, two homers, 18 RBIs, 10 stolen bases, 18 walks (6.9%) and 85 strikeouts (32.6%). Weaver strikes out way too much, but it doesn’t appear he’s swinging for the fences, as he does hit the ball much more frequently on the ground. Instead, it seems he has way too many moving parts which causes his swing to get too long — this is common for someone of his build. Hopefully, with a little more experience and confidence, he can reduce his strikeouts and thereby get full use of his speed.

Weaver has shown good range in the outfield, with just two errors in professional ball thus far. He was nearly 17 months younger than his competitors in the Pioneer League, so it wouldn’t be out of the question if Weaver returned to Great Falls. However, it seems likelier that he’ll begin the 2020 season with Kannapolis instead. 


Arizona League White Sox

James Beard
5´10´´
170 pounds
B/T: R/R
Age: 19

Beard dominated as an outfielder for Loyd Star High School in Brookhaven, Miss. this year. In 27 games, he slashed an impressive .429/.626/.1000 with eight doubles, one triple, 10 homers, 30 RBIs, 46 runs, 31 walks (29.0%) and 10 strikeouts (9.3%) while being perfect in 26 stolen base attempts. Flashing back to the East Pro Showcase before his senior year, Beard ran the 60-yard dash in a rapid 6.21 seconds. He was verbally committed to Meridian Community College, so when the Sox selected him in the fourth round of this year’s draft, he actually received an under-slot bonus of $350,000. Baseball America said of him at the time of the draft, “He has a chance to develop into an average hitter thanks to his speed and solid swing. Beard does not project as a power hitter by any stretch, but he has shown he’s can run into 10-12 home runs in pro ball. Defensively, Beard outruns his mistakes for now, but he has potential to be an above-average center fielder with more experience to improve his routes and reads.”

With the AZL Sox this year, Beard struggled acclimating to the speed of the game. In 31 games totaling 127 at-bats, Beard slashed just .213/.270/.307 with four doubles, two triples, one homer, 12 RBIs, nine stolen bases, eight walks (5.8%) and 54 strikeouts (39.1%). He did hit the ball on the ground (1.65 GO/FB), but he had difficulty hitting curveballs. MLB Pipeline ranks Beard 20th among all White Sox prospects and grades his running at 80, fielding at 55, and hitting, power and arm at 45.

It may take a while for Beard to show what he can do on the diamond, as he likely didn’t face much competition in varsity ball. He’s a bit raw offensively, but he’s been compared favorably to Billy Hamilton at the same stage. Beard may be best served to continue his development with the AZL squad next year (he was about 16 months younger than league average), but he likely will begin in Great Falls instead.       

Misael Gonzalez
6´0´´

175 pounds
B/T: R/R
Other positions played: Left field, Right field
Age: 18

Gonzalez was a relative unknown when he was selected in the 12th round of this year’s draft by the White Sox. Shortly after the draft, then-Amateur Scouting Director Nick Hostetler called him an 80-grade runner who showed power potential at his pre-draft workout at Guaranteed Rate Field. Gonzalez unsurprisingly scuffled in his first professional season as he slashed just .195/.246/.237 in 36 games with five doubles, six RBIs, one stolen base, eight walks (6.3%) and 52 strikeouts (40.9%). Of the four center fielders listed in this group, he’s the youngest and most raw. Expect to see him return to the AZL for the 2020 season. 


DSL White Sox

Johnabiell Laureno
6´0´´
180 pounds
B/T: R/R
Other positions played: Left field, Right field
Age: 19

A native of San Pedro de Macris in the Dominican Republic, which is arguably the most famous baseball community in the world, Laureano received an international signing bonus from the White Sox in February 2018. In his first taste of baseball last year, at about nine months younger than his average competitor, Laureano slashed just .220/.329/.262 in 65 games with nine doubles, 13 RBIs, four stolen bases, 31 walks (12.3%) and 54 strikeouts (21.4%).

This year was a much different story in his return to the DSL, as he slashed an impressive .357/.437/.543 in 59 games with 15 doubles, three triples, six homers, 36 RBIs, six stolen bases, 28 walks (11.4%) and 43 strikeouts (17.5%). His OPS this year was better than everyone in the Sox organization not named Luis Robert, and he did it while performing in the shadow of the highly-esteemed Benyamin Bailey.

Certainly, there are some red flags as his strikeout-to-walk ratio will likely get worse with each new competition level he encounters. Also, he was a tad bit older (three months) than his competition this year, which doesn’t sound like much but it can make a big difference in how he’s viewed by scouts. It’s quite possible that, even though Laureano may not have the blazing speed of the three guys above, he may actually be a bit more polished. We should find out more next year, as he’s expected to begin the season with the AZL Sox.