Today in White Sox History: December 10

Doubling back: After his brother purchased the club from Bill Veeck in 1961, John Allyn returns the “keys to the White Sox.”


1963
One of the last players from the “Go-Go” Sox era, second baseman Nellie Fox, was traded to the Houston Colt 45s for pitchers Jim Golden and Danny Murphy. Fox, who’d eventually be elected to the Hall of Fame, played for 14 years on the South Side, being named to 12 All-Star teams. He was AL MVP in 1959 and won three Gold Gloves. Fox was dealt because young infielder Don Buford had hit .336 at Indianapolis and was ready to take over.


1975
After first being turned down, American League owners voted to allow Bill Veeck to buy the White Sox from John Allyn. The agreement kept the team in Chicago and ended speculation that the Sox were bound for Seattle, with Charlie Finley’s A’s headed for the South Side. Major League baseball wanted the Sox to move to the Pacific Northwest in order to end lawsuits filed after the Pilots were moved to Milwaukee before the start of the 1970 season.

It was the second time Veeck owned the club, the first time being from 1959 through July 1961.


1976
Bill Veeck came up with a unique way to try to bolster his cash-strapped franchise: A Rent-a-Player approach, attempting to acquire as many players as possible who were about to become free agents. He figured that because those players were playing for new, big money deals, they’d play hard every night.

With that as the backdrop, he traded relief pitchers Rich Gossage and Terry Forster, both former American League Fireman of the Year winners, to the Pirates for slugger Richie Zisk and pitcher Silvio Martinez.

Zisk, in his one season on the South Side, would belt 30 home runs and knock in 101 as the undisputed leader of the South Side Hit Men who shocked baseball by winning 90 games in 1977. Among Zisk’s home runs that season were a blast into the original center field bleachers at Comiskey Park (under the exploding scoreboard) and one over the roof and out of the park in left-center.


1987
GM Larry Himes sent pitcher Floyd Bannister and infielder Dave Cochrane to the Kansas City Royals in exchange for four players, including pitchers Greg Hibbard and Melido Perez. Both would help stabilize the starting rotation in the early 1990s.

 

Today in White Sox History: November 29

Bronx brawler: Buzhardt earned just 6.1 bWAR over six South Side seasons, but his Yankee-killing made him worth the price of admission. (Topps)


1961 — The White Sox sent slugging infielder Roy Sievers to the Phillies for two players, including pitcher Johnny Buzhardt. Buzhardt would become part of the stellar Sox starting rotation in the mid-60s. He was particularly good against the Yankees, going 7-0 against them between 1962 and 1967.


1963 – He had a spectacular 1963 season, and because of it Gary Peters was named the American League Rookie of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America. The star left-handed pitcher went 19-8 with a 2.33 ERA and had 189 strikeouts in 243 innings pitched. He won 11 straight games at one point. He also hit .259, with three home runs and 12 RBIs. Peters would go on to win 20 games in 1964, lead the league in ERA in 1966 and make the All-Star team twice. He got 10 of 20 first place votes in beating out his teammate, power-hitting third baseman Pete Ward.

Ward, who would be named American League Rookie of the Year by The Sporting News, hit .295 with 22 home runs, 84 RBIs and had 177 hits that season. Ward got six first place votes among the baseball writers while Jimmy Hall of the Twins got the final four votes.


1967 — The White Sox reacquired shortstop Luis Aparicio from the Orioles as part of a six-player deal. Aparicio would have his best offensive seasons in the next few years, but speedy Don Buford was part of the return bounty for the Orioles. Buford would go on to have his best seasons with Baltimore, and was a key part of their dynasty in the late 1960s/early 1970s.

 

 

Today in White Sox History: September 25

Culpable: Ward had a pair of solo home runs during a strange Sox streak in ’65.


Sept. 25, 1965 — The White Sox set the franchise record by hitting their 15th consecutive solo home run. The streak started at Baltimore on September 2, when Johnny Romano homered in the second game of a doubleheader. The run continued until this day in New York. Pitcher Tommy John hit the last home run in the streak. The breakdown saw Ken Berry with five solo home runs, Don Buford, Romano and Pete Ward with a pair each and John, Floyd Robinson, Moose Skowron and Bill Voss with one solo home run. The Sox would tie this rather odd record in 2016.