Today in White Sox History: December 9

JD to the rescue: Despite getting a better offer late in his free agency, Dye stood by his word to GM Ken Williams and joined the White Sox for what would become a five-year stretch. (@JermaineDye)


2004
White Sox GM Ken Williams signed oft-injured outfielder Jermaine Dye to a free agent deal. Dye would prove to be perhaps the best free agent signing in franchise history, as he helped lead the club to a World Series championship in 2005, being named the series MVP. That year, he’d hit 31 home runs with 86 RBIs. Then in 2006 he’d have an even greater campaign, blasting 44 home runs with 120 RBIs. In five seasons with the Sox, J.D. would average 33 home runs and 92 RBIs.

 

 

Today in White Sox History: December 6

Bold stroke: GM Roland Hemond stuck his neck out to make baby shortstop Ozzie Guillén the centerpiece of a winter trade — and won it, bigtime. (@RonVesely)


1959
In an effort to try to repeat as American League champs, Bill Veeck and Hank Greenberg decided to make a series of moves to bring in hitters at the expense of some of the top young players in the Sox system. Veeck originally tried to get young stars like future White Sox coach Orlando Cepeda from the Giants and Bill White from the Cardinals, but was turned down. So he went in the only direction he felt he could.

The first deal brought the Sox back outfielder Minnie Miñoso at the cost of future All-Star power hitting first baseman Norm Cash and future All-Star power hitting catcher Johnny Romano. Cleveland also got Bubba Phillips. Sox manager Al Lopez was quoted after the controversial deal as saying, “Some of us, like me, are not worried about next year because we might not be around then.”


1984
It was one of the most brilliant and gutsiest deals even completed by GM Roland Hemond, a deal that paid dividends immediately and 20 years down the line. Hemond sent former Cy Young Award winner LaMarr Hoyt to the Padres in a package deal that netted the Sox a 20-year-old shortstop named Ozzie Guillén. The Sox also got valuable utility player Luis Salazar.

Guillén immediately went on to fill a gaping hole in the infield and was named Rookie of the Year. He’d win a Gold Glove and become a three-time All-Star before coming back as manager in 2004. He’d then win the World Series in 2005 and make the playoffs again in 2008. Hoyt would be out of baseball by 1987, after battling weight and drug addiction issues.


2005
Frank Thomas, probably the best hitter in team history, became a free agent after the Sox declined to pick up his $10 million option. White Sox GM Ken Williams had no choice in the matter, as Thomas was coming off back-to-back injury-plagued seasons. At his age and weight, and with the addition of slugger Jim Thome, there was no longer a place for Thomas in the lineup. The Big Hurt would eventually sign an incentive-laden deal with the A’s in late January and continue his Hall of Fame career.


2016
One of the biggest winter meeting trades in memory saw the White Sox send Chris Sale, one of the top pitchers in the game, to the Red Sox for a number of prospects. The deal included the top minor league player in the game, Yoán Moncada.

Sale was brilliant in his six-plus years with the White Sox, winning 74 games with a 3.00 ERA. He made the All-Star team five times, pitching five innings and winning the 2013 contest. He set White Sox records for most strikeouts in a season (274) and had four consecutive years of more than 200 whiffs. After four straight losing seasons, the franchise decided it was time to rebuild and Sale was in demand, so the painful decision was made to trade him and hope for a better future.

 

Today in White Sox History: November 25

Cheeky rookie: Guillén made quite a splash in his 1985 debut. (Fleer) 


1985Ozzie Guillén of the White Sox was named AL Rookie of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America. Guillén, who came to the Sox in a deal involving 1983 Cy Young winner LaMarr Hoyt, didn’t disappoint. His defense was outstanding, committing only 12 errors the entire season. Offensively, Ozzie recorded 134 hits and had a .273 batting average. He received 16 of 28 first place votes and finished with 101 points. Teddy Higuera of the Brewers was second. Ozzie would return to the Sox after his playing days ended to become the manager, winning the 2005 World Series with the club.


2005 — White Sox GM Ken Williams rolled the dice and traded popular outfielder Aaron Rowand to the Phillies for slugger Jim Thome. The Peoria native would hammer 42 home runs and garner the AL Comeback Player of the Year award in 2006, but many felt the trade changed the chemistry and philosophy of the club that won the World Series in 2005 — to say nothing of the defensive hole it created in center field. Thome would play almost four years with the Sox, with 134 home runs and three seasons of at least 90 RBIs. Thome hit his 500th career home run in 2007 at U.S. Cellular Field.

 

 

Today in White Sox History: November 9

Capping it off: Guillén took home a big award after the World Series. (Keith Allison/Wikipedia)


2005 — After a season that saw the White Sox win their first World Series title since 1917, the Baseball Writers Association of America awarded the Manager of the Year award to Ozzie Guillén. Guillén, the former Sox All-Star shortstop, guided the team to a wire-to-wire Central Division title with 99 wins; they then went 11-1 in the postseason, capping it off with a sweep of Houston for the championship. Ozzie picked up 17 first-place votes and 105 total points to beat out Cleveland’s Eric Wedge. Wedge got six first-place votes and 71 points, while the Yankees Joe Torre was third with 43 points.

Today in White Sox History: October 31

No fun allowed: The White Sox got this World Series cover, but nothing after they actually won it all.


2005 — As the White Sox were winning their first championship in 88 years, Sports Illustrated put Scott Podsednik and his winning home run from the second game on the cover. The long caption read, “World Series. In A Match Up Of Two Title Hungry Teams, The White Sox Struck First, Dramatically Downing The Astros In Games 1 And 2.”

The magazine then basically ignored the White Sox winning the Series by only putting a small circle shot of the team celebrating in the corner of the following week’s cover, breaking a long standing tradition. The cover that week was Peyton Manning and Tom Brady as the magazine previewed a regular season NFL game.

Description: Description: Scott Podsednik, Baseball, Chicago White Sox
so gross

Today in White Sox History: October 28

Many of us were there: The 2005 receive a warm welcome from two million happy fans. (Chicago White Sox)


2005 – It was one of the largest turnouts for a championship celebration in Chicago sports history, as nearly two million people lined the parade route in the downtown area/South Side to honor the World Series champions. White Sox players and management addressed the crowd, and Paul Konerko presented the last out/game ball to owner Jerry Reinsdorf.

Today in White Sox History: October 26

(Chicago Tribune)


1931 — Sox founder and owner Charles Comiskey died in his home in Eagle River, Wis. He left his entire estate to his son J. Louis Comiskey, including the White Sox. His estate was valued at more than $1.5 million dollars at the time., the equivalent of $17 million today.


1993 — White Sox manager Gene Lamont, who guided the team to its first postseason appearance in 10 years, was named American League Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA). Lamont would beat out Buck Showalter of the Yankees for the honor. Lamont got 72 total points to Showalter’s 63. Lamont picked up eight first place votes to seven for Showalter.


1994 — Even though his quest for the Triple Crown was cut short by the labor impasse shutting down baseball six weeks early, Frank Thomas still did enough to garner his second straight MVP award from the BBWAA. Thomas outdistanced future Sox outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. and future teammate Albert Belle, finishing with 24 first place votes out of a possible 28. He ended up with 372 points to Griffey’s 233 and Belle’s 225.

In 113 games, Thomas hit .353 with 38 home runs, 101 RBIs, 106 runs and 109 walks. With the award, Thomas became the first back-to-back AL winner since Roger Maris in 1960 and 1961.


2005 — On this night in Houston, the Sox became World Series champions for the first time since 1917. Freddy Garcia and three relief pitchers shut out the Astros on five hits, 1-0, sweeping the best-of-seven series in four games. The Sox shut out Houston for the final 15 innings of Series play.

Outfielder Jermaine Dye drove in the game’s only run and was named the World Series MVP. The South Side exploded in an orgy of delight, as fans celebrated all over the area.

“stockyard workers … “

Today in White Sox History: October 25

Blum of a blast: The longest game in World Series history ended soon after a midseason pickup made his mark. (YouTube)

1955 — Sox co-GMs Chuck Comiskey and John Rigney made their first trade: Shortstop Chico Carrasquel and center fielder Jim Busby went to Cleveland for slugging centerfielder Larry Doby, the left-handed power hitter the Sox had been lacking the previous three years. The deal also made room in the starting lineup for a rookie shortstop from Venezuela named Luis Aparicio.


1983 — Thanks to the most wins in the majors and a second-half run among the best ever, pitcher LaMarr Hoyt won the Cy Young Award. Hoyt was 9-8 at the All-Star break, then exploded to go 15-2 in the back half to end the year with a record of 24-10 and an ERA of 3.66. In addition, Hoyt pitched almost 261 innings with only 31 walks. He then threw a brilliant, complete game, 2-1 win over the Orioles in the ALCS in Baltimore.

Hoyt became the second White Sox pitcher to ever win the award, following Early Wynn. He easily outdistanced Kansas City’s Dan Quisenberry, 116-81, in voting points. Hoyt won 52 games for the White Sox between 1981 and 1983.


2005 — Game 3 of the World Series set the record for the longest by duration in history. The 14-inning game in Houston lasted five hours, 41 minutes and ended when another White Sox role player, Geoff Blum, belted a home run to give the club a 6-5 lead. It would end 7-5, with Game 2 starter Mark Buehrle picking up the save.

Today in White Sox History: October 24

(@WhiteSox)


2000 Ken Williams was named the new White Sox GM, replacing the retiring Ron Schueler. Williams, a former Sox player, would bring passion and heart to the position. He also wasn’t afraid to take risks, no matter how many times they failed. He built a World Series champion by 2005, which remains his signature moment in the organization.


2005 — The White Sox winning the pennant for the first time in 46 years, no less on the strength of four straight complete games, drew only a small cover mention in Sports Illustrated. In the upper left corner was a photo of Paul Konerko swinging with the caption, “At Last! The White Sox Are In The World Series.”

Today in White Sox History: October 22

(YouTube)

2005 — 46 years after their last World Series, the White Sox finally got back to another one. Game 1 against the Houston Astros finished as a 5-3 White Sox win at U.S. Cellular Field. Jermaine Dye and Joe Crede hit home runs. Jose Contreras pitched seven innings, and the bullpen tandem of Neal Cotts and Bobby Jenks saved the game.

Full ballgame.
Final out.